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  1. #1
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    Iraq....terrorist...and I'm sick of it.

    When did they STOP being called 'terrorist' and are called 'insurgents'?

    They can take their bold attack and kiss butt. If they don't settle down and quit threatening us.....I'm going to feel real decent with a NUKE attack.
    Oh...this is interesting. There is NO TIE between Iraq and the terrorist group of Ben Laden.....yeah right!!! Then why are they there and making threats towards the US and other countries in the name of Al-Qaida?

    They've attacked us in so many ways long before 9/11...that it's unblievable they still have breath in them. I've never gotten over the attack on the USS Cole where friend of mine was killed and another crippled for life who is the Dad of my daughter's friend.

    I'm mad and I'm tired of ***** footing with these jerks. Our guys die daily because everyone is against a REAL WAR. Meanwhile these complete asses can rule the world with their terror because no one wants to step up to the plate.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Iraqi PM Warns Neighbors on Insurgency
    Friday, December 31, 2004

    By BASSEM MROUE, Associated Press Writer
    BAGHDAD, Iraq - Prime Minister Ayad Allawi made an unusually strong warning to Iraq's (news - web sites) neighbors to crack down on insurgents infiltrating from their territory, saying Friday that Iraq's patience was wearing thin. Al-Qaida, meanwhile, claimed responsibility for a bold attack on U.S. troops.

    Iraqi officials have repeatedly accused Syria and Iran of supporting the insurgents waging a campaign of violence against American forces and Allawi's U.S.-backed government. Both countries have denied helping militants or allowing them to cross their borders into Iraq.

    But Allawi's comments to Baghdad's Al-Iraqiya television were among his toughest yet. "Some countries are hosting people who are involved in harming the Iraqi people," he said, without naming any nations. "Harming Iraq and its people is not allowed."

    He said his government had contacted the countries and was waiting for their reply. "According to the answers we will decide what the next step will be," he said.

    "Iraq is not a weak country. Iraq is passing through a difficult period but Iraq can respond in a strong way if needed," he said. "Patience has limits and it is beginning to run out."

    Meanwhile, the U.S. first Infantry Division detained 49 suspects guerrillas during a midnight raid in the town of Duluiyah, 45 miles north of Baghdad, the military said Friday. The sweep appeared to be the latest in a series of anti-insurgency campaigns in the so-called Sunni Triangle in central Iraq.

    Al-Qaida in Iraq, led by the country's most wanted terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, claimed responsibility for a well-coordinated attack Wednesday on a U.S. post in the northern city of Mosul. The U.S. military said one American soldier and 25 insurgents were killed in the battle.

    The militants, however, claimed they had suffered no casualties.

    "We, al-Qaida in Iraq, claim responsibility for the battles of Mosul, may God cleanse it from the impurities of the infidels," said a statement posted on a Web site that often carries militant claims.

    Wednesday's attack began with a massive truck bomb exploding just outside a U.S. checkpoint, followed by attacks by squads of 10-12 insurgents.

    A Stryker vehicle reinforcing the Americans was hit by a roadside bomb and a second car bomb. U.S. forces then called in airstrikes by F-18 and F-16 fighter jets, which launched three Maverick missiles and conducted several strafing runs.

    In new violence, a car bomb exploded next to a taxi carrying Iraqi national guardsmen in the town of Beiji, 155 miles north of Baghdad. A passenger car, which happened to be passing by at that moment, absorbed the brunt of the blast, killing its two occupants while five guardsmen were wounded, said Maj. Neil O'Brien.

    In Samarra, 60 miles north of Baghdad, U.S. troops came under mortar attack Friday. They opened fire, killing an Iraqi and wounding two, local hospital sources said.

    North of Fallujah, a body of an Iraqi national guardsman was found with a handwritten note pinned to it saying: "This is the fate of anyone who collaborates with the occupation forces."

    Allawi, who earlier this month accused Syria of harboring officials from the ousted Saddam Hussein (news - web sites)'s regime, described a spate of guerrilla attacks in December that have killed hundreds of people — mainly members of the security forces — as "a catastrophe." Defense Minister Hazem Shaalan accused Iran and Syria of supporting "terrorism in Iraq."

    Insurgents have intensified their strikes in a campaign to disrupt the Jan. 30 general elections for a constitutional assembly that will set up the next government and write a new constitution. Rebels have targeted members of the interim government's security forces, perceived as collaborators with American occupiers.

    During Friday's prayers in a Baghdad mosque, Sheik Ahmed Abdul-Ghafour Al-Samarie of the Association of Muslim Scholars — an influential Sunni group — demanded that the U.S. troops pull out of Iraq.

    "We have to realize that God is mightier than America and more powerful than the occupation forces," he said.

    "America, which conducted crimes everywhere and supported Israel against Muslims, should take the lesson of the torrent and surge of the ocean in Asia," Al-Samarie said, adding that the United States could be destroyed in a similar manner.
    [/b]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    I'll give you some help:
    Main Entry: in·sur·gen·cy
    Pronunciation: -j&n(t)-sE
    Function: noun
    Inflected Form(s): plural -cies
    1 : the quality or state of being insurgent; specifically : a condition of revolt against a government that is less than an organized revolution and that is not recognized as belligerency
    Belligerency is being in a state of war. They have been called insurgents all along. It is true that they carry out terrorist attacks, and that they could be described as being terrorists (domestic or otherwise), but they can also be described as being insurgents.

    And for your complaint about the connection between Iraq and Al-Qaida, there was no direct connection between the two BEFORE the invasion. We all know that someone from Al-Qaida did meet with a member of the Iraqi government. By a stretch of the logic used to say that Iraq was supporting Al-Quaida before the war I could say that Rumsfeld was involved in Saddam killing his own people.

    Anyway, I can accept (sort of) the arguement that we should have invaded Iraq because Saddam is a poop head or something, but to say that Iraq was involved in 9-11 is an outright falsehood.

    And back to the thread title, does the label they have make them different? Everyone understands that they are blowing our soldiers up, but mostly they are blowing up Iraqi civilians.

    Anyway Iraq != Al-Qaida.

  3. #3
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    Our guys die daily because everyone is against a REAL WAR. Meanwhile these complete asses can rule the world with their terror because no one wants to step up to the plate.
    Well, no one's capable of fighting a "REAL WAR" with the United States. They don't have the manpower, finances, or infrastructure. It's safe to say anyone who would fight like we do would lose.

    Think back 229 years ago. British loyalists were saying the same things you are saying now, they were quite pissed that those dirty colonists were fighting unfairly. They wanted the american colonists to fight a REAL war, where you had little drum ceremonies, and lined up in little rows and shot horribly inaccurate rifles at each other. We fought dirty, the same guerilla warfare tactics we demonize today.

    War is not civil. You've got to do what you've got to do.

    The insurgents don't want us in their country. It's fine to be angry that they're killing our men and women, but you gain nothing from mischaracterizing their struggle. They are not bloodthirsty fanatical terrorists flying planes into buildings. They are enemy soldiers, and it's somewhat ridiculous to get upset that they're not fighting the way you'd like them to.

  4. #4
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    Oct 2004
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    Call these people Terrorists or insurgents, it's one and the same. Why are they so against Elections in Iraq?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by alkali
    Call these people Terrorists or insurgents, it's one and the same.
    In this case yes, but this isn't always true.

    Quote Originally Posted by alkali
    Why are they so against Elections in Iraq?
    Apparently they disagree with the idea of elections or the legitimacy of the upcoming elections. I am not Iraqi, nor am I part of an Iraqi insurgency and can't really speak for them.

  6. #6
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    ! That's just what we need, more forum members who are part of the Insurgency.

  7. #7
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    Notice that I rarely post in here?
    My Daughter Rules!

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  8. #8
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    Are you trying to tell us something?

    Are you an insurgent?

  9. #9
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    I'm with Alkali.....if they want freedom for their people....why don't they simply back off....have an election and be peaceful about it? Truth it....they don't want freedom or peace. They want a warlord atmosphere so they can continue terrorizing their own people....especially the women.

    If we are the bad guys for trying to fix that....so be it.

    I've been against the war....not because I think we are wrong for the motive....but because I personally don't give a rat's A$$ if they vote or are free or not. I don't care what happens to most of them anyway. However, the majority of the soldiers there feel differently. Not the ones who whine....but the real soldiers there who believe in their mission because they can see the results. Many of them have really come to care for these people.

  10. #10
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    Nah, I really don't have as strong an opinion on politics or religion so I pretty much stay clear unless there's something I don't understand posted.
    My Daughter Rules!

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